Apparel • Museum • Gifts

21060 Geyserville Ave • Geyserville, CA 95441 • 707.857.3463

Now through Christmas we are open
Fri & Sat 11-6 and Sun 11-3.

 

The Bosworth and his son, were George and Obed Bosworth back in 1911 when the store first opened.  Now days you’ll find the next generations, Harry (third generation) and his daughter Gretchen (fourth generation), manning the shop.

Bosworth & Son Store carries hats, apparel and gifts.  Their extensive hat selection includes brands such as Stetson, Resistol, Dorfman and Atwood.  Western wear for men, women and children include Wrangler jeans and Panhandle Slim shirts.  You may also find the perfect little gift for your home or friends.

Bosworth & Son also offers hat services such as custom crushing, general cleaning or hat restoration.

Bosworth & Son Store

Bosworth & Son Store

827

Ladies & Mens Hats, Western Wear, and Unique Gifts

From Geyserville MuseumGeyserville School Houses - Independence SchoolIndependence School, was first mentioned in December 1866 with 46 students and quarterly apportionment of $92, two dollars per child. Located south of Geyserville on Jim and Laura (Lampson) Furlong’s property, previously her grandparents Everett and Ora (Caldwell) Lampson’s property. In April 1876, Miss L. L. Bernard, teacher had 20 scholars. The Trustees had secured a full set of the American Encyclopedia, the building newly painted, and the lot neatly fenced. A singing class was organized on Sundays with preaching three Sundays each month. In March 1917, “two carloads of ladies” from the Mothers’ Club of Geyserville attended the Neighbors’ Club of Independence district in honor of the student's punctuality and attendance. Eight students sang Miss Meyer’s school song. This was followed by discussions on “Child Nutrition,” “Fats,” “Cause of acidity in fats, butter,” “What is Meant by Chemical Element,” and “The Co-Efficient of Digestibility.” Samples of very nice soaps were presented to guests after Mrs. Whitton’s joyful “Keep on the Sunny Side of Life” with all joining in. “The literary part of the afternoon…could not excel…the many delicious cakes and excellent lunch. "Independence school was first to consolidate with a special election in August 1922 with students to transition into town beginning July 1923; noted as the first case of this kind in Sonoma County. But, Superintendent Ben Ballard, Santa Rosa, got special permission for the high school bus to be used to enable the Independence students to attend Geyserville Grammar School in fall of 1922. Mrs. Henley, Principal, announced…all children who would become six years of age before March 1 were eligible to attend. ... See MoreSee Less
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5 days ago

Bosworth & Son Store
New Geyserville T’s just in time for Christmas 🎄 ... See MoreSee Less
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All the entries were so awesome, I don’t know how they were able to pick! Fantastic parade Geyserville! 🎄 ... See MoreSee Less
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2 weeks ago

Bosworth & Son Store
From the Geyserville Museum Geyserville School Houses – Hamilton School Hamilton School established in 1864 is one of oldest schoolhouses. It was first located on Hamilton Ranch in upper Dry Creek Valley, which became the A. M. Winter place, and then was later moved to its current location. Hamilton School was closed in May 1936 when Tom Baxter III was the only student. He went on to attend Geyserville Union HS along with the other upper Dry Creek Valley students already there.In October 1936, “the old Hamilton school and grounds…sold to Carl Petersen…three acres…sale price said to be $250.” and then became home to four generations of Carl and Alice (Winter) Petersen. The sale had been delayed in August and September when residents of upper Dry Creek had hoped to raise enough to purchase the property for a community club.W. E. Richards, Horace Board, and John B. Bishop, (school named for Board’s grandfather who came in 1849), were among the first pupils. “Teachers in the old days found the task of imparting of knowledge strenuous work,” according to Richards (in 1936). “Way back in ’65 pupils staged a riot in the old Hamilton school. They chased the teacher, known as ‘Baldy Wilson, tore desks out, and kicked boards from the building. Wilson…wore a long tailed coat, which must have blown out like a flag during the chase. He was the second teacher for the school. Many pupils attending school…in their late ‘teens and some were even 21 years of age. However, if grandfather, or great great grandfather, tries to tell the younger generation about how good he was when he was a boy and I went to school, it need only show him this story, and ask him just what would happen to boys of today if they attempted a revolt against the three r’s.”Anna Jo (Peterson) Black Rued, 99, (Nov. 30, 1921-July 23, 2021), the youngest of six children of Peter and Estella (Skiffington) Petersen, grew up in the hills above Hamilton school. Anna and probably all of her siblings attended Hamilton School. Reminiscing with Ann Howard and Yael Bernier in 2013, she told how she and her brother Peter would hide under the school and look out the knot holes to watch the gypsies with covered wagons, horses or mules, traveling along the dirt road, Dry Creek Road. She said her oldest brother Carl started working with horses at age 11, and was known for swearing at them. “You could hear him clear down in the school yard and the teacher wasn’t very happy about it.” ... See MoreSee Less
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