Apparel • Museum • Gifts

21060 Geyserville Ave • Geyserville, CA 95441 • 707.857.3463

Now through Christmas we are open
Fri & Sat 11-6 and Sun 11-3.

 

The Bosworth and his son, were George and Obed Bosworth back in 1911 when the store first opened.  Now days you’ll find the next generations, Harry (third generation) and his daughter Gretchen (fourth generation), manning the shop.

Bosworth & Son Store carries hats, apparel and gifts.  Their extensive hat selection includes brands such as Stetson, Resistol, Dorfman and Atwood.  Western wear for men, women and children include Wrangler jeans and Panhandle Slim shirts.  You may also find the perfect little gift for your home or friends.

Bosworth & Son also offers hat services such as custom crushing, general cleaning or hat restoration.

Bosworth & Son Store

Bosworth & Son Store

835

Ladies & Mens Hats, Western Wear, and Unique Gifts

From The Geyserville Museum Early Geyserville newspaper Just weeks ago, The Healdsburg Tribune announced it would be going out of business after 157 years. Thankfully, at the eleventh hour, the paper was purchased by the Bohemian, and they will continue publication. During this transition, the Tribune gave a stack of old Geyserville Press newspapers to The Geyserville Museum for safe keeping. Ann, our curator, is organizing the odd years – 1935-7, 1953, 1969-1970, some loose and some bound, into flat archival boxes. All this reminded her of the two newspapers printed in Geyserville. On February 3, 1899, the first issue of the Geyserville Gazette (1899-1918) was printed in Geyserville, edited by Henry Hastings and Anthony. In June 1908 Elmer Nordyke, “well-known telephone manager and candy dealer,” purchased the floundering Geyserville Gazette located in the two-story Odd Fellows building where Locals Tasting Room is today. He planned to install a linotype machine and took instruction in San Francisco. The machine was described as “the latest model No. 5 with quick-changing magazine and other up-to-the minute appurtenances.” By May 1911 he moved his printing office, candy and ice cream store, all under one roof up the street to where Hairdos For Hounds is now. By 1913 he added a bakery in the back of the store and in 1915 became Postmaster. Unfortunately, he and his wife filed for divorce by January 1918, and Nordyke sold the Gazette in May to Oscar Fellson. Fellson became postmaster in February 1919, but then died a year later. “Geyserville Gazette dies a natural newspaper death without saying goodbye” (50 years ago, Healdsburg Tribune, Enterprise and Scimitar Dec. 26, 1968). ... See MoreSee Less
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From The Geyserville MuseumThe Geyser Water CoDid you know that mineral water was bottled at The Geysers in the 1890's? The Geyser Water Co, managed by C. L. Dingley Jr was located in San Francisco, and distributed in San Francisco, Chicago and New York. ... See MoreSee Less
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2 weeks ago

Bosworth & Son Store
From The Geyserville MuseumGeyserville Builders and 1906 Earthquake Receipts for RepairsA 1903 letter found on Ebay written by Mark R. Hammond: “Friend [G. E.] Lukens [lawyer], I received a letter from Harry McGill (Indian) stating he was sick with malaria. If he is well enough I would like him to come over at once. I have lot of work here and will have for the rest of the fall [September 1903].”“The best and quickest way for him to get here would be on the cars. In case he wants to drive over tell him he can go by the way of Marysville and travel the same route we took to Calpella. Then he can follow down the rail road track and river all the way to Geyserville, so there is no chance of him getting off of the road. The sooner he gets here, the better it will suit me not to longer than ten days getting here as I will have to engage other help by that time. If he will come kindly advise me at once.” M. R. Hammond, Geyserville, Sonoma County.Harry McGill was native of the long valley section of Lake County, and a bricklayer and plasterer by trade. Mark Hammond was also a talented mason that lived in Geyserville from 1903-1907. 1903 and 1904 saw a number of homes built in Geyserville – the George Bosworth house, the Hoffman House (Geyserville Grille), the Etta Bosworth House (Legallee home), the Ed Mason home and others. Hammond and McGill might have worked on some of these.An invoice kept by Nancy (Ellis) Daziel regarding the Oriental School repairs following the 1906 earthquake is from M. R. Hammond. “September 28, 1906, bill to Mr. S. Vaugn [Vaughn] from M. R. Hammond, for 5.5 days work at $7 a day along with the same hours for helper at $3 an hour, total $55.” The Healdsburg paper dated August 23 noted that “Martin Dana and Scott Eproson have been doing the carpenter work on the Oriental school house…damaged by the earthquake.” ... See MoreSee Less
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2 weeks ago

Bosworth & Son Store
A sunny May Day forecast tomorrow. You might want a hat! ... See MoreSee Less
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